Archive for the ‘Adobe Software’ Category

Vector And Rastor: What’s The Difference?

When working as a web or graphic designer, it is very important to understand the difference between "vector" and "rastor". These are two words used to describe the basic structure of a file or program. Take the Adobe Creative Suite for example, some of the programs included within the Suite are vector based, while others are rastor based. In particular, you should note that Photoshop is a rastor based program, while Illustrator and InDesign are both vector based programs.

Now I still haven’t answered the question of what the difference between the two is though. Well here is your explanation. The word raster refers to pixels (or points if you will), while vector refers to lines. When making an image, you can base it off of two things; individual points in the image that are colored in whatever way you want that come together to make an image, or a bunch of lines that define spaces and colors, thus creating an image. Still not getting it? That’s okay… Let me try by talking about what you’d want to use for different types of projects.

Photo Editing: Photos are loaded with tons of information all the way down to the pixel level, thus making them rastor based. If you were to take a photo and try to expand it ten times larger than it already is, it is going to get blurry. That’s because for every individual pixel of information, you are trying to turn that into 100 pixels, giving it seemingly less detail. But without simplifying that image, there is no way to really replicate it using just lines is there? That’s why photos are rastor based, but are also limited in how big you can make them.

Logo Design: Now say you are working on a logo, and you need it to work in a lot of different places (on a website, on letterhead, on a business card, or on a giant billboard). That means you need an image that can shift in size but not lose it’s definition. To do this, you want to use a vector based software. So if your logo has a "+" in it, you can make that as big as you need without distorting it, because it is defined using lines, and no matter how you alter it, it will always be two lines. Now don’t limit yourself to thinking of lines as having to be straight. Vector based software thrives off using curves. This is why vector based software is so much more ideal for making things with writing in them. Letters just don’t do well under rastor based software because you lose the specific curve of a font to aliased pixels.

And really, that’s the difference between "vector" and "rastor". You want to use rastor software when working with photos. But for pretty much anything else you are going to want to stick to vector software so that your copywriting doesn’t lose quality, and so that you can change the image size without losing quality.

Any questions? Ask away!

Photoshop, Illustrator, And InDesign: What’s The Diff?

The Adobe Creative Suite is an amazing (albeit expensive) tool. In reality though, it is comprised of over a dozen different pieces of software that all have unique functionality, purposes, strengths, and even faults. For my web and graphic design needs, I think that three specific pieces of software are particularly relevant. I use Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign on a daily basis, but for different reasons. Need to know the difference between these three pieces of Adobe software? Want to know what to use each one for? Read on!

Adobe Photoshop
Photoshop is a great tool, but people often use it for the wrong reasons. Photoshop is a raster based software, meaning it works on a pixel based level. Images built using rastor based software can easily become pixelated, but that can be avoided. Photoshop is ideal for editing pictures/photos but not ideal for images with text, or for designing layouts for web or print.

Adobe Illustrator
Illustrator is hands-down my favorite of all the Adobe products out there. You can produce pretty much any type of image or file from it, so I use it to produce all of my web graphics, web designs, and even documents. Illustrator is different from Photoshop in that it is a vector based software, meaning instead of working on a pixel level, it works using lines. You can zoom in and out as much as you want from whatever you make in Illustrator, and it will never lose it’s detail. Now when you output that into a rastor based image such as a jpg, you may end up with some pixelation, but when resizing within Illustrator, you’ll never lose that detail. If you continuously resize your image in Photoshop, you will certainly distort it. So all of this makes Illustrator great for producing web graphics, documents, and full page designs, but not so great for working with photographs.

Adobe InDesign
InDesign is most commonly used for complex book layouts. What I personally tend to use it for is actually to produce pdf presentations. As a designer, I much prefer pdfs over any other document type such as a Word document or Powerpoint presentation as I think they appear more professional. InDesign is a vector based program just like Illustrator, and has much of the same capabilities, but focuses it’s strengths on multiple pages and master pages. This allows you to make a master view for your presentation or book (i.e. logo in the bottom right corner, page numbers, et cetera) while also allowing you to customize each page. I wouldn’t advise InDesign over Illustrator for anything but books and presentations simply because you do lose some functionality from Illustrator.

To help you decide between software options, try out this table:

Project Description Photoshop Illustrator InDesign
Editing Vacation Photos
Editing Photos To Print
Editing Photos To Post Online
Creating An Icon For The Web
Creating An Image For The Web
Creating An Image With Text
Creating A Document For Print
Creating A Document For The Web
Creating A Website Design
Creating A Multiple Page Document
Creating A PDF Presentation
Creating A Book Layout

If you have any specific questions or examples you’d like to ask about, don’t hesitate to ask!